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E. coli Superbug Can Sustain in Women’s Gut without Indications

Women’s urethra is comparatively shorter than men’s, which makes then gullible to urinary tract infections (UTI).

A new study has shown that multi-drug resistant E. coli can live in women’s gut without any symptoms. Scientists from the University of Washington Health Sciences and UW Medicine have found 8.8% of healthy women with no clear symptoms of urinary tract infections carried with a superbug, E. coli strains in their gut. The study was published in a journal called ‘Clinical Infectious Diseases’, which exhibited that disease-causing pathogens can transfer from a woman’s gastrointestinal tract to her urinary tract via urine tract and urethra. This is duet to women’s urethra is comparatively shorter than men’s, which makes then gullible to urinary tract infections (UTI).

Scientists analyzed data from over 1,000 healthy women who do not have any symptoms of UTI. During the research, scientists found fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli in 8.8% of healthy women. Moreover, most of the pathogens belonged to multi-drug resistant strain T1193 or STI131-H30R clonal groups. Furthermore, urine samples of women who had fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli were collected and over one-third of them had a positive test for E. coli growth. Scientists also studied whether or not these patients might have taken any antibiotic drugs during the study. However, none of the patients had taken any antibiotics.

The authors said, “The two pandemic fluoroquinolone-resistant urinary tract pathogenic strains of Escherichia coli found in the clinical specimens are superior gut colonizers and tend to persist there. They can also show up, at an unusually high rate, in the urine of healthy women who did not have a documented urinary tract infection diagnosis at the time of sample testing. Both phenomena appear to be interconnected,” they added. However, preventive measures can reduce the risk of these pathogen carriers